Celery & Celeriac

Celery has become a staple in our kitchen.  I don’t know why, but celery in the US is all about the stalks.  Eaten as a snack, we all remember ants on a log, peanut butter and raisins on celery.  But we have celery fields about a mile away from our house, and they don’t resemble what you buy at the store.  A bushy plant with beautiful green leaves, all those flavorful leaves are cut off and left in the field to be turned into soil, but those leaves hold all the flavor.  In Europe they value the leaves for all the wonderful flavor they add to soups and stews.  I saute up the leaves and stalks with onions and carrots, the French trinity, as a base for many dishes.  Celery is one of the few vegetables that has umami, the flavor of richness that makes a dish feel balanced and satisfying.  It’s a valuable addition to so many sauces for its richness that is usually only found in meat dishes.  Heirloom celery is packed with flavor, peppery and rich.  It is unmatched in its complexity of flavor and impact in everything you cook.

Celeriac is a grown for its delicious, celery flavored root.  It can be grated in a salad, roasted, pureed or cooked in a stew.  Both Celery and Celeriac have a long growing season, so it’s important to start them indoors very early.

Sort By: